Science

By Exclusive

I’ve Got a Feeling …

Wall Street types “earn” millions on theirs, sportscasters make uncanny predictions, and entrepreneurs start businesses that defy logic and become legends. It’s all about having the guts to trust your gut.

By Exclusive

The Ghost

National Magazine Award winner Paige Williams follows the trail of the FBI’s most unlikely fugitive: a charming, handsome, onetime devout Mormon, on the run from a brutal murder.

How Many of Your Memories Are Fake?

When people with Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory—those who can remember what they ate for breakfast on a specific day 10 years ago—are tested for accuracy, researchers find what goes into false memories.

Nov 2013
By Exclusive

Addicted to Antidepressants?

Scores of patients call Paxil, a top-selling antidepressant, their emotional lifesaver. But some say that getting off the drug has been physically torturous. Now they’re asking, Why weren’t we warned?

Apr 2003

Deep, Active Penetration

How researchers at one toothbrush maker figure out ways to make dental hygiene a pleasurable experience.

May 2000

We’re All Gonna Die!

But it won’t be from germ warfare, runaway nanobots, or shifting magnetic poles. A skeptical guide to Doomsday.

Jul 2003
By Exclusive

Scents and Science

Muzak is fading, “environmental fragrancing” is wafting in—especially in Japan, where people really believe that aromas affect mood and behavior.

Mar 1993
By Exclusive

Two Rapes, Three Victims

After Rebecca Villers and Janet Johnson were raped, a man was arrested, tried and convicted. Five years later, a controversial test showed he couldn’t have committed the crimes.

Mar 1994
By Exclusive

Planet Killers

A true sci-fi tale of rogue asteroids threatening to obliterate the Earth, and the plucky scientists and astronauts scrambling for ways to stop them.

The Deadliest Virus

Did a scientist put millions of lives at risk—and was he right to do it?

Mar 2012
By Editors Recommend

Do I Love My Wife? An Investigative Report

One married man, a machine that can read his mind, and a head-to-head matchup between his wife … and Angelina Jolie. Sounds like no good can come of this. Unless, of course, he discovers the meaning of love.

May 2009
By Editors Recommend

The Boy Who Heard Too Much

He was a 14-year-old blind kid, angry and alone. Then he discovered that he possessed a strange and fearsome superpower—one that put him in the cross hairs of the FBI.

Sep 2009

Arctic Fever

In the far north of Alaska, the fragile food web that supports polar bears and humans alike may be starting to unravel.

Feb 2011
By Editors Recommend

If the Stones Could Speak

Searching for the meaning of Stonehenge.

By Editors Recommend

Running Out of Time?

The fate of our planet will be determined in the next few decades, through our technological, lifestyle, and population choices.

May 1998

The Evolutionary Psychology of Religion

Is there a “God gene”?

Oct 2004
By Editors Recommend

Buried Answers

Routine hospital autopsies have come to be seen as a waste of time. But the dead have much to tell us about treating and preventing disease.

The Mathematics of Terrorism

Seemingly random attacks contain an unexpected regularity: the same numerical pattern seen in Wall Street booms and busts.

Jul 2010
By Editors Recommend

You Talkin’ to Me?

Teaching apes to speak their mind.

Jun 1977
By Editors Recommend

Sky Lab

A strange new Air Force facility creates enough energy to control the ionosphere—but not the conspiracy theorists.

Aug 2009
By Editors Recommend

Whose Life Would You Save?

Scientists say morality may be hardwired into our brains by evolution.

Apr 2004

The Virus Hunter

HIV, Ebola, and the vast majority of other killer diseases have passed from animals to humans. So Nathan Wolfe is searching for the next AIDS before it makes the leap—and is revolutionizing the way the world tries to control diseases in the process.

Mar 2009

Does God Exist?

The case for reconciling the scientific with the divine—and against the anti-religion of Richard Dawkins.

Oct 2011

A Kaleidoscope at the End of the Tunnel

For a small group of researchers and their patients facing death, psychedelic drugs aren’t a hippie palliative. They’re a new way to approach the most dire time of life.