From the Web

The Tsunami Survivor Who Lost Her Whole Family

Sonali Deraniyagala lost her husband, children and parents in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and was maddened with grief. What has saved her is daring to remember—and to write.

Mar 2013
From the Web

Tom Waits: “I Look Like Hell but I’m Going to See Where It Gets Me”

It’s decades since Tom Waits had a drink and his music has just got weirder and better. With his 17th album out, he heads for his local roadhouse (for coffee) and talks about songwriting, hard living and his fear of phones.

Oct 2011
From the Web

David Foster Wallace’s Suicide Turned Him into a Celebrity Writer Dude

David Foster Wallace, the most gifted and original American novelist of his generation, took his own life in 2008. His widow, the artist Karen Green, talks of the struggle to deal her loss and her decision to publish his unfinished work, The Pale King.

Apr 2011
From the Web

Danny Boyle: “As Soon as You Think You Can Do Whatever You Want … Then You’re Sunk”

How do you follow a film that sweeps the Oscars and wins universal acclaim? If you’re Slumdog Millionaire director Danny Boyle, you switch genre, downsize, work harder … As well as directing 127 Hours, a film that tells the true story of stricken climber Aron Ralston, Boyle is taking a production of Frankenstein to the National and overseeing the Olympics opening ceremony. And what drives such relentless energy and enthusiasm? A fear of mediocrity …

Dec 2010
From the Web

Elvis Costello: “I’ve Never Liked the Word Maturity. It Implies Decay”

The man who once distrusted happiness has found domestic bliss in Canada with his wife and twin sons, has had a successful TV series in the States and even played a gig at the White House. But Elvis Costello still manages to summon up righteous anger and dismay for his 33rd album.

Oct 2010
From the Web

Joan Miró: A Life in Paintings

Miró’s work is loved for its joyful celebration of life and colour. But it also contains ideas of freedom which, in Franco’s Spain, were very dear to the Catalan painter. We look again at the man, and trace his personal journey through six great paintings.

Mar 2011
From the Web

Yann Arthus-Bertrand: Looking down on Creation

Yann Arthus-Bertrand isn’t just an aerial photographer: he’s on a mission to save mankind by teaching us to love our beautiful planet. To many, he is France’s answer to Al Gore, but why do some think he’s an “enormous idiot”?

Mar 2011
From the Web

Royal Engagement: Kate’s Triumph for Britain’s Middle Classes

Prince William’s fiancee represents a level of social climbing greater than the one in Downton Abbey—but class snobbery still lurks in the background.

Nov 2010
From the Web

Sargy Mann: The Blind Painter of Peckham

The British painter Sargy Mann was diagnosed with cataracts at 36, and went on to lose his sight completely. But in his mind’s eye his vision did not fade. Mann found new ways to keep working and today his paintings, collected by Daniel Day-Lewis among others, are more acclaimed than ever.

Nov 2010
From the Web

Tricky: “I Can Still Be Really Dark in My Mind”

Tricky’s mother killed herself when he was four and violence has always surrounded him, so it’s little surprise that he has battled to make sense of his life. But the Bristolian musician is confronting the truths about his past.

Sep 2010
From the Web

Ed and David Miliband: The Battle of the Brothers

They were raised with socialism in their blood. Now David and Ed Miliband are vying for the Labour leadership. But how do they feel about sibling rivalry on this scale—and how would each seek to direct the party if successful?

Sep 2010
From the Web

David Cope: “You Pushed the Button and Out Came Hundreds and Thousands of Sonatas”

Composer David Cope has spent the last 30 years teaching computers to create classical music.

Jul 2010
From the Web

Anthill: A Six-Legged Adventure from Science to Fiction

How leading biologist EO Wilson turned his passion for ants into a best-selling novel.

Jun 2010
From the Web

The Many Faces of Fabio Capello

Thirteen ways of looking at the England manager as he prepares his team for the World Cup—from bibliophile to existentialist.

Jun 2010